Sourdough Focaccia- healthy & simple Recipe

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A quick glance at this sourdough focaccia recipe may make you think it’s not something you’ll ever want to try. After all, it requires less sugar than most recipes for this type of bread, yet it still tastes delicious. It’s one of the best-selling recipes on this site, so I’m guessing you’ll agree.

This is a simple sourdough focaccia recipe that can be made in about two hours.

When you leave the country without a care in the world, you can sleep soundly at night knowing your family is fed and the house is stocked. We all know that making dinner is a great way to spend time with your family and we spend a lot of time preparing it.

Making homemade bread may be intimidating for some home chefs, but this simple, adaptable sourdough focaccia recipe, inspired by the traditional Italian focaccia, is just what you need to get started! Unlike traditional focaccia, it requires a sourdough starter, which provides a depth of flavor that store-bought focaccia breads cannot match. Yeast is used in regular bread, and it is then allowed to perform its job and cause the bread to rise. Because the yeast is already active when using the sourdough starter, the bread will be more delicious and chewy.

Because of the sourdough, the bread has a somewhat acidic taste and a crunchy, chewy texture. It’s fluffy on the inside and has bubbly holes on the outside that you can make with only your fingertips and no additional equipment. You’ll need the basic bread components (flour, water, salt) as well as the sourdough starter for this recipe. Dip the bread in extra virgin olive oil.

Sourdough-Focaccia-Recipe

Sourdough Focaccia:

Prep. Time: 2Hrs. Waiting Time: 18-24Hrs. Cooking Time: 35Min. Yield: 1 loaf

This sourdough bread recipe is simple to prepare. The sourdough starter is first incorporated into the dough. The dough is let to rest for many hours, resulting in the ideal texture and taste in your Sourdough Focaccia. After these resting times, the dough is placed on the baking pan and pushed into tiny indentations with the fingers. The bread is baked until it is cooked through after being drizzled with olive oil.

INGREDIENTS

  • 50 g – 100 g (1/4 to 1/2 cup) active starter
  • 10 g (about 2.5 teaspoons) kosher salt
  • 430 – 440 g water, room temperature
  • 512 g (about 4 cups) bread flour/whole wheat flour
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided, plus more for drizzling
  • Nice, flaky sea salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Place the starter, salt, and water in a large bowl. Stir with a spatula to combine — it doesn’t have to be uniformly mixed. Add the flour. Mix again until the flour is completely incorporated.
  2. If time permits, perform one “fold”: 30 minutes after you mix the dough, reach into the bowl and pull the dough up and into the center. Turn the bowl quarter turns and continue this pulling 8 to 10 times.
  3. Drizzle with a splash of olive oil and rub to coat. Cover bowl with a tea towel or bowl cover and set aside to rise at room temperature (70ºF/21ºC) for 4 to 18 hours (the time will vary depending on the time of year, the strength of your starter, and the temperature of your kitchen — in summer, for instance, my sourdoughs double in 6 hours; in winter, they double in 18 hours. Do not use an oven with the light on for the bulk fermentation — it will be too warm.
  4. It is best to rely on visual cues (doubling in volume) as opposed to time to determine when the bulk fermentation is done.
  5. When dough has doubled, place 2 tablespoons of olive oil into a 9×13-inch pan.
  6. Drizzle dough with a tablespoon of olive oil. Use your hand to gently deflate the dough and release it from the sides of the bowl. Gently scoop the dough into the center of the pool of oil in your prepared pan. Fold dough envelope style from top to bottom and side to side to create a rough rectangle. Turn dough over so seam-side is down.
  7. Rub top of dough with oil. Leave alone for 4 to 6 hours, uncovered, or until puffy and nearly doubled.
  8. Heat oven to 425ºF. Rub hands lightly with oil, and using all ten fingers, press gently into the dough to dimple and stretch the dough to nearly fit the pan. Sprinkle generously with sea salt. Transfer pan to the oven and bake for about 35 minutes or until golden all around. Remove pan from oven and transfer bread to a cooling rack. Cool at least 20 minutes before slicing.
Sourdough-Focaccia-Recipe

Tips

-Don’t be tempted to add additional flour if the dough is sticky; this will result in a thick dough.

-Time.. Once your starter is ready to go, this recipe requires an initial 4- 18 hour rise, followed by a second 4- to 6-hour second rise. After the initial rise (depending on the time of year and temperature of your kitchen), you can deflate the dough, and stick it in the fridge for 8 to 10 hours (maybe longer), which might help you regarding your schedule. Keep in mind, when you remove the dough from the fridge and transfer it to a pan, it will still need to rise for another 5- to 6- hours.

-Use enough olive oil to keep the dough from sticking to the baking pan.

-This bread may not be the healthiest since it just has a few basic ingredients, but it is simple to prepare and tasty! Use wholewheat flour for a healthier alternative.

-If you’re in a hurry, you may create the sourdough focaccia using pizza dough.

-Add finely sliced onions and pitted green olives to the bread top before baking to make focaccia Genovese.

-Fresh rosemary sprigs, cheese (mozzarella or parmesan), mushrooms, grapes (halved and deseeded), or garlic are all excellent toppings for sourdough focaccia.

1630461750_978_Sourdough-Focaccia-Recipe

How to Keep Sourdough Focaccia Fresh?

Sourdough Focaccia is best served fresh, but leftovers may be kept in the fridge for up to 2 days (in an airtight container). Reheat it in the oven if you want it to be crispy (the microwave will make it soggy).

Notes

Remove the bread from the oven as soon as possible to avoid it becoming soggy due to the steam.

Sourdough Baguette Recipe This is a very simple sourdough focaccia recipe. I’ve had some success with this recipe and hope to continue making them. I don’t know what type of flour you use, but the recipe works with the same amount of flour as it does with all-purpose flour. I like to use a combination of white and whole wheat flour, and lightly whole wheat flour and rye flour. I also like to use a little honey and olive oil in the dough, and some salt and baking soda for texture and flavor.


A focaccia is a type of Italian bread that is made with yeast, flour, salt, water and olive oil.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why is my sourdough focaccia not rising?

Your dough may not be ready to rise. You can try adding more yeast or baking powder, but if that doesnt work, you might need to use a different recipe.

Is focaccia dough the same as pizza dough?

Focaccia dough is a type of pizza dough that is typically made with olive oil, salt, and water.

What makes a focaccia a focaccia?

A focaccia is a type of Italian bread that is made with yeast, flour, salt, water and olive oil.

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